Hailing from the Isle of Skye, legendary Scottish trailblazers the Peatbog Faeries create a glorious mixture of traditional sounds and dance-floor grooves that has been embraced worldwide.

Drawing upon a dazzling myriad of influences from jigs and reels through dance music, jazz, african, and more, they bring the sound of Scotland fresh-faced and breathless to the new audiences around the world.  Their mainly instrumental music allows the band to develop exciting themes and soundscapes, as well as locking into their trademark hypnotic ‘Celtic Dance’ sound that no-one can resist moving to!

The bandcelebrated their 25th anniversary in 2016 on the back of the critically acclaimed album Blackhouse, and 2017 saw the release of their new live album Live@25.

Peatbog Faeries are made up of Peter Morrison fronting on pipes and whistles that interplay with the amazing fiddle sounds from Ross Couper. Tom Salter on guitar performssubtle licks and chord patterns to crowd-pleasing solos.  Graeme Stafford’s keyboards provide a perfect link to the backline machine of Innes Hutton on pounding bass and Stuart Haikney ondrums that hold it all together with style.


Support comes from Bury’s own Zoe Eliza.

From a young age, Zoe Eliza has been captivating audiences across the country, with her mournful, yet gritty narratives, and haunting voice. Having grown up in Bury, she has taken inspiration from her own experiences of life in the north of England, and its intriguing history. Combining this with her own fascination with the folklore, and tales of the land, Zoe creates rich, vivid, and beautiful tales, well beyond her years.

Dates & Times

Last session: Sat 7 Jul 2018 at 8:00 PM - This event has now passed
Derby Hall
£18

Standing + limited seating

Zoe Eliza: On stage 8pm
Peatbog Faeries: On stage 8.45pm

Reviews

“Nothing prepares you for the high octane music of the Peatbog Faeries. Powerful melodies are dextrously pumped out with a smart degree of techno attitude, while cross-rhythms ricochet over a heavy bass that hits you forcefully like a massive heart beat.”

The Scotsman